Monday, September 11, 2017

Should Massage Hurt?

Have you been wondering if a massage has to hurt to be effective? 

If so, you are not alone.



Many people believe that a massage has to hurt in order to be effective. Well it don’t! You’ll be happy to hear that the saying, “No pain, no gain” doesn’t apply to massage therapy. Sometimes the most effective massages are the ones that don’t cause you any pain. Something that feels marvelous, and it’s good for you too? It doesn’t get much better than that!

Deep Tissue Massage might cause some discomfort….

A deep tissue massage is when the massage therapist manipulates the deeper layers of your soft tissue. Soft tissue includes your muscles, ligaments, fascia, and tendons (it’s pretty much everything that isn’t bones or organs). Usually your massage therapist will use lotions or oil, and will work lighter at first, this is important, it helps relax the top layer of tissue and muscle, meaning less pain for you. Then the deeper layers of muscle can be worked on more easily and with less pain.  This will feel much better and you will get better results!

Typically, deep tissue massage is recommended for those with chronic pain caused by tight muscles or injuries. Deep tissue massage can be very therapeutic because it helps with relieving patterns of tension that have developed over time and helping with muscle injuries. With a good deep tissue session massage will feel more relaxed after the massage if no pain was endured during it. It’s hard (nearly impossible) to relax if you are in pain, and muscle tension will release in a state of relaxation.

Deep tissue massage is not for everyone! You are not a wimp if you don’t like it. It is one of the more involved and intense massage techniques. Some people simply like the feeling of more pressure, and a firm massage isn’t always deep tissue. Just be sure to communicate with your therapist about what you prefer and need. Speak up your therapist will appreciate your feedback, happy clients are regular clients, and your therapist wants you to love your massage.

Pain versus Discomfort

Muscles naturally react to any sort of pain. When your muscles feel that your body is about to be injured the reflex to deflect the pain is stimulated. If your massage therapist is ever applying too much pressure, your muscles tighten together to naturally counterattack the force, and that is not a great way to relax. A massage is meant to relieve the tension of your muscles so if you feel as though the massage therapist is applying too much pressure for comfort, just ask them to use less pressure. Seriously, they want you to.

Don’t go into the massage thinking there won’t be any discomfort at all though. Pain and discomfort are two different things. People usually describe discomfort as a “good hurt” - especially in reference to getting a massage. When you experience pain during a massage, it is more than discomfort and could even cause bruising or injury.

Everybody has different tolerances for pain, so a massage that is painful for one person may not be painful for you. If you find that your massage therapist isn’t working between your tolerance levels for pain, then it’s important that you say something. Massages should almost never cause you physical pain and very rarely is it okay for you to be left with marks on your body afterwards.

If you are booking your first massage, you probably don’t want to start out with a deep tissue session. Ease your way into massage therapy and start with something less specific, like Swedish or integrative massage. Most therapists combine massage techniques and will try to give you the best massage for you.

For more massage info and a great massage check out: http://www.carefreeservices.org

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

10 Wonderful Reasons To Drink Carrot Juice



Just a small cup of fresh carrot juice will do your body lots of good.

1. Fiber Source: A great source of fiber and promotes metabolism. It also helps maintain gut fauna.

2. Liver Friendly: It reduces fat and bile in the liver helping it detoxify the body better.

3. Nutrient Rich: Has magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, manganese, Vitamin A, C, E and K.

4. Anti-cancer: It has surplus Vitamin E, which slows down cancer cell build up.

5. Low Calories: Is very low on calories making it help control weight.

6. Bone Health: Has ample Vitamin A; improves vision and bone health.

7. Anti-inflammatory: Helps cope with chronic inflammation like arthritis.

8. Healthy Heart: High amounts of potassium help control cholesterol and is good for heart health.

9. Antioxidants: High traces of Vitamin A and C, both of which are excellent natural anti-oxidants.

10. Stress Buster: With a mix of minerals and nutrients it promotes healing. Rejuvenates body and mind.
For massage and detox services check out http://www.carefreeservices.org

Monday, September 4, 2017

The Benefits of Dry Brushing

Our skin does not just protect everything that is underneath it – like our muscles, organs, joints, bones, and blood vessels. It also works as one of our largest detoxification systems. Our bodies have a surface area of between 1.5 and 2 square meters. Our skin consists of several different layers that are made of different types of cells. The very top layer, called epidermis, works like a waterproof barrier that protects the other layers beneath where vessels, sweat glands, and nerve endings are located. The other two main layers are called the dermis and hypodermis. The dermis is where we can find both blood and lymphatic vessels.

#1. Dry Brushing can Activate the Lymphatic System
The lymphatic system is a major part of the body’s immune system. It is made up of organs and lymph nodes, ducts and vessels that transport lymph throughout the body. Proponents of dry brushing claim that brushing the skin regularly helps stimulate the normal and healthy lymph flow within the body and assist the body in detoxifying itself naturally.
#2- Balance Hormones
Because the lymphatic system helps to circulate hormones throughout the body, it follows that stagnant lymph may not get hormones where they need to be as efficient as they should be. Another technique that supports lymph flow – manual lymphatic drainage – which is focused on the massage therapist using light short stroking of their hands to move lymphatic fluid.
#3 – Detoxification and Waste Removal
The lymphatic system is one of two circulation systems in the body – the other is the cardiovascular (heart and blood)  system. While the cardiovascular system pumps blood, the lymphatic system collects blood that leaks out of vessels and returns it to its place. One of its primary jobs is carrying away metabolic waste and toxins.
#4 – Soft, Smooth Skin
Dry brushing removes dead skin cells and encourages the production of new cells. This benefit is often noticed the first time a person dry brushes. The process of running a firm, natural bristled brush over the skin helps loosen and remove dead skin cells, naturally exfoliating skin. You’ll notice softer skin even after just your first treatment. Dry brushing is one of the simplest and most natural ways to exfoliate skin. You'll love this benefit of skin brushing and how soft your skin feels when its done this regularly! There are claims that it can help soften cellulite. 
#5 – Mind Body Connection
Dry brushing is also an excellent way to improve our mind-body connection. Often we spend all day go-go-going, juggling to-do lists and schedules – sometimes this mental load can keep us “in our head” and feeling disconnected from our physical selves. Having dry brushing at the beginning of a massage you can re-establish that connection and help you feel more connected to your body. If that sounds a little too simple for you, here’s how it works, dry brushing’s gentle and soothing strokes to the nervous system, which supports adrenal functions by reducing stress.

Monday, March 6, 2017

What to Expect from a Hawaiian Lomi Lomi Massage

Hawaiian lomi lomi massage is one part of traditional Native Hawaiian medicine and was only passed down in families until the early 1970s when a few Hawaiian teachers began teaching this massage therapy technique to non-Hawaiians. The popularity of this technique spread quickly, and it's now widely available.

lomi


Some background

Because lomi lomi was passed down in families, a number of styles of this massage exist. One of the first people to teach this massage to non-Hawaiians was Auntie Margaret Machado, who taught until her death in 2009, and many practitioners do the massage in her tradition. However, a number of variations are available, including ones based on the teachings of another early teacher, Abraham Kawai'i. Some other names you might hear are Mana Lomi, Sacred Lomi or Hawaiian Temple Bodywork.

Traditionally, lomi lomi has an important spiritual component, and practitioners begin by saying a prayer to themselves. This massage incorporates the Hawaiian concept of aloha, which means love, unification, and breath, and promotes personal harmony. Even in modern practice, lomi lomi therapists are taught to focus on the massage with love and intention. Auntie Margaret Machado is often quoted as having said that the difference between Swedish massage and lomi lomi is "loving touch."

What to expect

Typically, massage therapists begin a lomi lomi session by placing their hands gently on you and remaining still for a few moments. They may ask you to breathe deeply to help you relax.

Often, more of your body is uncovered during this massage than during a typical Swedish or deep tissue massage. That's because therapists rarely massage one body part at a time. Instead, they move in long flowing motions that, for example, may start at the top of your shoulder and go all the way to your foot. Some therapists use massage sheets in the usual way, just uncovering larger areas of your body at once. The more traditional practice is that the therapist uses no sheets, covering your genital area and breasts with small towels.

Lomi lomi is best known for long, flowing, dance-like strokes, often using the forearms and generous amounts of oil. But, because there are so many styles, the specifics of a massage can vary. Gentle stretches and joint rotations are common in this massage, as is the massage therapist massaging two parts of your body at the same time, for example, using one hand or forearm on your shoulder while simultaneously massaging a hip with the other hand or forearm.

Both massaging two areas at the same time and the long flowing strokes are believed to promote harmony and balance in your body. Traditional lomi lomi always includes abdominal massage because Hawaiian tradition considers the colon part of a person's soul or heart.

Benefits

The physical benefits of this massage are the same as other types of massage in terms of relaxing muscles, promoting circulation and releasing blocked energy. The difference lies in the Hawaiian traditions woven into the massage, including the belief that "loving hands" help you release not only physical tension but also mental, emotional and spiritual blockages.

The pampering effect of a soothing massage can offer many benefits and alleviate physical and emotional issues, including the following:

Manage anxiety and stress
Ease depression
Improve circulation
Lower blood pressure
Reduce backache pains
Lessen headaches
Reduce arthritis pain
Ease sore muscles
Reduce spasms and cramps
Create a meditative state
Increase range of motion

If you'd like to try a Hawaiian Lomi Lomi massage check out http://www.carefreeservices.org for more information and scheduling.

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Massage Frequency for Health and Relaxation!

Massage for General Health and Relaxation

    For general health and relaxation - I recommend of massage 1 to 2 times per month if you have light stress.

For Stress Management
   If you have high-stress occupations or living conditions, or who travel frequently, I'd recommend a massage weekly or bi-weekly in order to help you cope with the stress.  The tension that builds up from stressful situations can be more easily managed with a weekly or every other week massage. Additionally, just knowing that you will be receiving a relaxing massage every week can be comforting.

Massage Therapy for Pain Reduction and Management
   Reduction of, and management of, pain requires a different type of frequency.  It's called diminishing frequency.  People in severe pain not requiring medical intervention can and receive massage therapy 1 to 2 times per week in the first week.  By the second and third week of treatment depending upon your response to the massage therapy, the frequency may be adjusted. When the pain is reduced so is the frequency of massage therapy. Even chronic pain conditions like fibromyalgia, lupus, carpal tunnel syndrome and chronic low back pain can have a diminishing frequency.

   Many people wonder about how often you should get massage therapy and bodywork, these are just examples.  Your current individual condition, goals, and likes may lead you to a different frequency. If you enjoy massage and relaxation, there is nothing wrong getting a massage every week.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Western Modality Massage Cupping

Western vs. Eastern Cupping, what's the difference?
In Western Modality Massage Cupping, the cup is kept in motion. Keeping the cup in motion prevents red marks from the suction. The overall treatment is amazingly relaxing and therapeutic. This style of cupping does not leave any marks on your skin like typical Eastern style cupping does.

One of the most amazing aspects of cupping is the “separation” or lift that the vacuum produces in tissue layers. This enables fluid absorption and renewed blood flow to dehydrated undernourished tissue, which is invaluable in body contouring treatments. Separation of tissue can be a huge catalyst for change as the body begins to eliminate chronic congestion and lymph becomes more fluid.

How is Western Modality Massage Cupping therapy accomplished? 
The cup is positioned over the area of the body to be treated and a light vacuum is created. The suction level can range from light to heavy, and the movements performed by the therapist can be stimulating or sedating. The cup is slowly moved around the area of treatment.



Massage cupping is also used in the treatment os scar tissue.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Custom Multi Modality Massage

The Problem
If you have had a pain in your back, would you need to have your therapist do deep tissue massage to your whole body? If you have a frozen shoulder should your therapist perform an orthopedic treatment on every joint? These questions are pretty basic and straight forward, nd their answer is 'of course not'.

Tools
Many good therapists get used to one or maybe just a few modalities. They are good at them and use them often for lots of clients. There's an old time saying “When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.” This is the same for some therapists and the way they work on their clients.

Having lots of different tools in their bag allows them to become more flexible and flexible in the massage they provide you. One of the keys to knowing which tool or tools are the right ones to use. The key to picking the right modality is open and frequent communications between you and your therapist. Every session should start with a few minutes where you the client is doing most of the talking.

So how might a Custom Multi-Modality Massage go? An example of what a multi-modality massage might be like, let's start with you talking with your therapist. Maybe you mentioned that over the weekend you over exerted yourself while doing yard work and you lower back is bothering you. Also, you're recovering from a bit of a cold. It has has been a little longer than you'd have liked since your last massage and you want to get some real relaxation.

How it works
This sounds like a lot but not really if your therapist had the right tools and was listening to you. So the overall massage would be a full body therapeutic relaxation massage (basically a slower and little bit deeper Swedish massage). You'd start the massage with you facing up, the therapist can easily massage the lymphatic glands in your neck, armpits which are the two biggest areas of glands. This lymphatic work would be worked into the overall massage of your body.

Once you've rolled over face down, the therapeutic relaxation massage continues but only after some warm heat packs are wrapped in soft towels and laid over your achy lower back. The massage of your back is saved for the last 20 minutes of the massage. The heat packs have done their job and softened the tight muscles of your strained back.

With the muscles in your lower back warmed and softened with an increased circulation, a slightly deeper massage really loosens up the muscles and helps relieve your pain.

Sounds a lot better than an hour of deep tissue massage on your back with some extra focus on your lower back. Your lower back might feel better but you do not get much relaxation, and you did not get any of the detox benefits of the lymphatic work.

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Thai Foot Massage

Thai Foot Massage is a relaxing yet invigorating treatment of the feet that was greatly influenced by two of its closest neighbor's China and India and their reflexology systems that are 1000's of year old.

Here’s some more information about Thai foot massage. When the Thai's met Chinese reflexology they softened the technique making it more pleasurable with a wide variety of 'sabaai' relaxing techniques to off-set the 'jep' deeper techniques of the Chinese approach. The result is a blend of Chinese Reflexology, Thai acupressure points and 'Sen Line' work along with wonderfully stimulating and relaxing hand techniques.

Similar to the meridians of Traditional Chinese Medicine that carry the Qi or Chi energy, the Thai Medicine 'energy lines' know as Sen run through out the entire body with specific points ending at the feet and hands. The obstruction of this flow of energy is thought to be the cause of discomfort or illness in a person and the techniques of Thai Foot Massage are thought to stimulate and open these channels. During a typical Thai Foot Massage session a Thai practitioner will apply a special Thai balm and use a variety of hands-on techniques including graceful two handed palm movements, stretches, circular massage movements and thumb pressure along with the use of a special Thai stick made out of teak for specific acupressure to stimulate organ reflex points on the soles of the feet. Clients leave the session feeling relaxed, balanced and invigorated.

The benefits of a Thai Foot Massage

  • Improved circulation and toxin removal.
  • Stimulated lymphatic drainage and immune system boost.
  • Reduced stiffness and improved flexibility.
  • Accelerated physical healing
  • Stress relief
  • Improved sleep
  • Clarity of mind


Thursday, February 9, 2017

Massage 101, Names for Everything!

The most common type of massage is Swedish massage therapy.

It involves soft, long, kneading strokes, as well as light, rhythmic, tapping strokes, on topmost layers of muscles. This is also combined with a movement of the joints. By relieving muscle tension, Swedish therapy can be both relaxing and energizing. And it helps after an injury.

The four common strokes of Swedish massage are:

  • Effleurage: a smooth, gliding stroke used to relax soft tissue
  • Petrissage: the squeezing, rolling, or kneading that follows effleurage
  • Friction: deep, circular movements that cause layers of tissue to rub against each other, helping to increase blood flow and break down scar tissue
  • Tapotement: a short, alternating tap done with cupped hands, fingers, or the edge of the hand



For more info about types of massage or to schedule one, go to http://www.carefreeservices.org

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

What to Expect from a Hawaiian Lomi Lomi Massage

Hawaiian lomi lomi massage is one part of traditional Native Hawaiian medicine and was only passed down in families until the early 1970s, when a few Hawaiian teachers began teaching this massage therapy technique to non-Hawaiians. The popularity of this technique spread quickly, and it's now widely available.

Some background

Because lomi lomi was passed down in families, a number of styles of this massage exist. One of the first people to teach this massage to non-Hawaiians was Auntie Margaret Machado, who taught until her death in 2009, and many practitioners do the massage in her tradition. However, a number of variations are available, including ones based on the teachings of another early teacher, Abraham Kawai'i. Some other names you might hear are Mana Lomi, Sacred Lomi or Hawaiian Temple Bodywork.

Traditionally, lomi lomi has an important spiritual component, and practitioners begin by saying a prayer to themselves. This massage incorporates the Hawaiian concept of aloha, which means love, unification and breath, and promotes personal harmony. Even in modern practice, lomi lomi therapists are taught to focus on the massage with love and intention. Auntie Margaret Machado is often quoted as having said that the difference between Swedish massage and lomi lomi is "loving touch."

What to expect

Typically, massage therapists begin a lomi lomi session by placing their hands gently on you and remaining still for a few moments. They may ask you to breathe deeply to help you relax. A traditional practitioner may incorporate other rituals, such as chants and music.

Often, more of your body is uncovered during this massage than during a typical Swedish or deep tissue massage. That's because therapists rarely massage one body part at a time. Instead, they move in long flowing motions that, for example, may start at the top of your shoulder and go all the way to your foot. Some therapists use massage sheets in the usual way, just uncovering larger areas of your body at once. The more traditional practice is that the therapist uses no sheets, covering your genital area and breasts with small towels.

Lomi lomi is best known for long, flowing, dance-like strokes, often using the forearms and generous amounts of oil. But, because there are so many styles, the specifics of a massage can vary. Gentle stretches and joint rotations are frequent in this massage, as is the massage therapist massaging two parts of your body at the same time, for example, using one hand or forearm on your shoulder while simultaneously massaging a hip with the other hand or forearm.

Both massaging two areas at the same time and the long flowing strokes are believed to promote harmony and balance in your body. Traditional lomi lomi always includes abdominal massage because Hawaiian tradition considers the colon part of a person's soul or heart.

Benefits

The physical advantages of this massage are the same as other types of massage concerning relaxing muscles, promoting circulation and releasing blocked energy. The difference lies in the Hawaiian traditions woven into the massage, including the belief that "loving hands" help you release not only physical tension but also mental, emotional and spiritual blockages.

The pampering effect of a soothing massage can offer many benefits and alleviate physical and emotional issues, including the following:

Manage anxiety and stress
Ease depression
Improve circulation
Lower blood pressure
Reduce backache pains
Lessen headaches
Reduce arthritis pain
Ease sore muscles
Reduce spasms and cramps
Create a meditative state
Increase range of motion

For more info about Lomi Lomi massage or to schedule one, go to http://www.carefreeservices.org

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Boost Your Immune System

Lymphatic Drainage Therapy Fights Infection Does your immune system work overtime? 

If so, you might want to give it a boost by seeing a massage therapist or bodyworker trained in lymphatic drainage therapy. This technique can boost your immunity by increasing the production of antibodies, stimulating circulation, moving congestion out of the body, and reducing swelling, especially after surgery.

  ManualLymphaticDrainage 

 The lymphatic system supports our body's immune function and involves several organs, glands, and tissues, hundreds of lymph nodes, and a network of vessels. A clear lymph fluid flows through these vessels and carries the metabolic waste (bacteria, dead cells, fats, fluids, proteins, and viruses) to the lymph nodes, where it is filtered. These nodes often swell when we are sick. 

The lymphatic drainage techniques used by massage therapists and bodyworkers gently stimulate lymph nodes, help correct swelling and stagnation in those nodes, reduce local fluid retention, boost the overall immune system, and provide relaxation. As an essential tool in the treatment of lymphedema (excess lymphatic fluid), this therapy is often applied postoperatively and can be especially beneficial for breast cancer patients. 

Administering this treatment requires advanced training and is performed with gentle, massage-like strokes. There should be no discomfort involved; in fact, you may feel you are hardly being worked on at all. 

Aftercare
After your lymphatic drainage treatment, it's possible you could feel some mild, flu-like symptoms, depending on how much strain your body has been under prior to treatment. This strain may be due to environmental pollutants, medication, and diet. Most people leave a session simply feeling relaxed, but if you don't feel at the top of your game, drink plenty of water, limit your salt intake, and stay physically active. 

Lymphatic drainage is one way to give your wellness a boost in a busy world that makes many demands on your immune system.


Saturday, July 19, 2014

What Is Reiki? Understanding Energy Work

A type of energy bodywork, reiki (pronounced ray-key) relies on the ancient belief in the life force energy, referred to as chi, that flows through all things. This life force runs throughout pathways in the body called meridians, nourishing organs and cells and supporting vital functions. When this energy is disrupted by negative thoughts, feelings or actions, illness and disease result. A reiki practitioner's hands hover just above a person's body, sensing the affected areas and infusing them with positive flow. This raises the energetic vibration and breaks up the negativity to heal, clear and restore the natural flow of the life force. The reiki practitioner, trained to access and serve as a channel for the life energy, places his hands on or just above the client's body and uses a passive touch that some clients experience with warmth or tingling. The hands remain in position for 3-5 minutes, alternately covering 10-12 positions over the body.


Thought to be Tibetan Buddhist in origin, the practice of reiki is comprised of three levels of training. Through this training, the practitioner learns how to access energy flow through the hands to heal. Completion of the third and highest level of training results in the title of reiki master. Reiki is used to accelerate healing, assist the body in cleansing toxins, balance the flow of subtle energy by releasing blockages, and help the client contact the healer within.


According to www.reiki.org, reiki is beginning to gain acceptance as a meaningful and cost-effective way to improve patient care in hospitals and clinics across America. In an interview on the website, Dr. David Guillion, an oncologist at Marin General Hospital in California, says, "I feel we need to do whatever is in our power to help the patient. We provide state of the art medicine in our office, but healing is a multidimensional process. I endorse the idea that there is a potential healing that can take place utilizing energy." For more information, consult your bodywork practitioner.

 

For more informaton about this or to schedule any type of massage check out my website http://www.carefreeservices.org

 

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Body Image - Learning to Love Who We Are

The statistics are alarming. The majority of U.S. women--some estimate more than 80 percent--are unhappy with their appearance. At least 10 million young women, and 1 million young men have an eating disorder. Girls as young as 6 and 7 are expressing disapproval of their looks, and most fourth-grade girls are already diet veterans. Most unsettling is the fact that more women, and girls, fear becoming fat than they do dying.

How do you see yourself? Are you content with the person looking back at you from the mirror each morning or do you frown in frustration?

Unfortunately, many of us are unhappy with the person looking back. Whether it's lamenting about having a pear-shaped figure instead of an hourglass, or exhibiting more serious, self-hating body dysmorphic disorders, body image is under siege in our celebrity-fixated society. While Madison Avenue continues to airbrush photos of svelte, 120-pound supermodels for magazine covers, others are trying to teach young girls to love their bodies, beautiful imperfections and all. One way to combat the Hollywood hype and to create an appreciation for the bodies we have is through hands-on massage and bodywork.

Why Massage Affects Body Perception
Being unhappy with our bodies has serious, and sometimes lifelong, ramifications. Feelings of unworthiness and self-loathing can set up a lifetime of self-deprecating behaviors. What regularly scheduled massage allows us to do is "get back" into our bodies and reconnect with ourselves. Massage can help us release physical and mental patterns of tension, enhancing our ability to experience our bodies (regardless of their shape and size) in a more positive way. Just as it facilitates our ability to relax, massage also encourages an awareness of the body, often allowing us to more clearly see and identify destructive behaviors, including overeating or purging.

Massage also creates a sense of nurturing that is especially powerful when it comes to poor body image. Accepting the nonjudgmental touch of a trained therapist goes a long way toward rebuilding an appreciation and respect for your own body. If we find acceptance for who we are and how we look, we are giving ourselves permission to live comfortably in the skin we have.
The Value of Massage
Research shows that touch is a powerful ally in the quest for physical and mental health. Not only does it help us be more in tune with our bodies, it can also helps restore a sense of "wholeness" that is often lost in our segmented, overscheduled lives. When we regain that connection, it's much easier to remember that our bodies are something to be cherished, nurtured, and loved, not belittled, betrayed, and forgotten.
Valuable for every age and every body type, massage and bodywork have innumerable benefits.

Here are a few:
- Alleviates low-back pain and improves range of motion.
- Decreases medication dependence.
- Eases anxiety and depression.
- Enhances immunity by stimulating lymph flow.
- Exercises and stretches weak, tight, or atrophied muscles.
- Increases joint flexibility.
- Improves circulation by pumping oxygen and nutrients into tissues and vital organs.
- Releases endorphins--the body's natural painkiller.

Every Shape and Size
Whether a client weighs 30 pounds or 300 pounds, massage and bodywork therapists are trained to appreciate all bodies, without judgment, and to deliver the best care possible. As in any session, a therapist's goal is to create an environment that feels safe and nurturing for clients, all while delivering much needed therapeutic touch. For heavier clients, some minor adjustments might be needed in the delivery of the bodywork, but its nurturing, therapeutic, nonjudgmental role will remain unchanged.

Through the Scars
We also have to remember that a negative body image is not necessarily about those few extra pounds on the hips. It might instead be tied to the scars of past injuries and surgeries. Massage can help here, too. For burn victims, research has shown massage can help in the healing process, while for postsurgery breast cancer patients, massage and bodywork can reintegrate a battered body and spirit. In addition to softening scar tissue and speeding postsurgery recovery, massage and bodywork for these clients is about respect, reverence, and learning to look at, and beyond, the scars.

Finding the Stillness
Experts say that when the tissues start to let go and relax under a massage therapist's hands, profound shifts occur emotionally and physically. A softening happens, and the brain and body begin
to integrate again. The chasm between body and mind that created the eating disorder, or fueled the negative body image, begins to narrow. In her book, "Molecules of Emotion," Georgetown University Medical School professor Candace Pert explains that the body is the "actual outward manifestation, in physical space, of the mind." She says that if we generate negative energy in response to our appearance, it can eventually find its way into reality.


Self-acceptance, then, is paramount for living well, and massage/bodywork is a healthy path to get you there. Finding the stillness in a massage session allows you to just "be," without judgment. Partner that with the comfort that comes from allowing your body to be nurtured by someone else, and we begin to remember our value, regardless of our outward appearance, or what we perceive it to be.

Check out my web site at: http://www.carefreeservices.org

Friday, July 11, 2014

Don't Blame Bad Weather for Your Aching Back



THURSDAY, July 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The notion that lower back pain flares up during certain kinds of weather may be all in your head, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Australia tracked nearly 1,000 people who were seen for acute low back pain at primary care clinics in Sydney. The investigators looked at weather conditions when the patients' back pain started, as well as one week and one month before it began.
Reporting July 10 in the journal Arthritis Care & Research, they found no connection between back pain and temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction or precipitation. Higher wind speeds and gusts seemed to slightly increase the risk of low back pain, but this was not to any "clinically significant" degree.

"Many patients believe that weather impacts their pain symptoms. However, there are few robust studies investigating weather and pain, specifically research that does not rely on patient recall of the weather," lead researcher Dr. Daniel Steffens, of the George Institute for Global Health at the University of Sydney, said in a journal news release.

"Our findings refute previously held beliefs that certain common weather conditions increase risk of lower back pain," Steffens said.
Prior studies have suggested that cold or humid weather, and changes in the weather, are linked with worsening symptoms in people with chronic pain conditions. However, based on the new findings, Steffens believes that similar studies might be needed to examine the role -- if any -- of weather for conditions such as fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

According to the researchers, nearly everyone suffers low back pain at some point in their lives. And, they noted, the World Health Organization estimates that up to one-third of the world's population is plagued by an aching back at any one time.

 

Massage has been shown to relieve back pain. Check out my website for some services to heal you heal and provide some pain releif http://carefreemassage.blogspot.com.

 

Sunday, December 22, 2013

Pure and Simple Focus!

Flowers can smell so amazing, fully awaking in our senses. A baby is so pure of heart and mind. We would all like to have this simple child awareness back in our everyday life.

Sending a wish that You Will find the pure and simple focus of a child who is fully experiencing the moment as new and wonder filled.

Childsfocus